Kett’s History the Interpreter of Prophecy (1799), vols 1, 2, 3.
One of a long tradition of works attempting to interpret historical and current events as fulfilments of biblical prophecy. Not surprisingly, Kett equates revolutionary France with the “Infidel Power” which, together with “Popery” and “Mahometanism”, constitute the Antichrist whose reign is supposed to precede the final triumph of Christianity at the “end time”.

Kett’s History the Interpreter of Prophecy (1799), vols 1, 2, 3.

One of a long tradition of works attempting to interpret historical and current events as fulfilments of biblical prophecy. Not surprisingly, Kett equates revolutionary France with the “Infidel Power” which, together with “Popery” and “Mahometanism”, constitute the Antichrist whose reign is supposed to precede the final triumph of Christianity at the “end time”.

Possibly the first evidence of trainspotting.

A letter, complete with helpful diagram, sent by Jonathan Backhouse to his sisters describing the opening of the Stockton and Darlington railway. This was the world’s first public railway, and Backhouse’s bank had helped finance it.

The large covered coach named “Experiment” had a table, cushioned seats and carpets. The other waggons were ordinary coal waggons - most had seats specially fitted for the occasion, but some carried coal and people sat on that.

mediumaevum:

Medieval architecture through engravings and photographs. The first set of pictures is by Thomas Hearne (1744 – 1817) and engraver William Byrne (1743–1805), from a series of historic monuments for The Antiquities of Great Britain. (You can see more on Medievalists).

The modern photos are from 1, 2, 3 respectively.

  1. Lanercost Priory, Cumbria
  2. Byland Abbey, North Yorkshire
  3. Tynemouth Priory, Tyne and Wear

The Antiquities of Great Britain (1786) on the Internet Archive.

A pastel drawing of the full moon by John Russell (1745-1806)
The lunar crater Russell commemorates both John Russell and his American namesake Henry Norris Russell (1877-1957).

A pastel drawing of the full moon by John Russell (1745-1806)

The lunar crater Russell commemorates both John Russell and his American namesake Henry Norris Russell (1877-1957).

destitutedandy:

Guys guys guys we really need to make this one thing clear

destitutedandy:

Guys guys guys we really need to make this one thing clear

(via ladycashasatiger)

kaitsauce:

John Constable, Cloud Studies, ca. 1820’s

"No two days are alike, nor even two hours; neither were there ever two leaves of a tree alike since the creation of all the world; and the genuine productions of art, like those of nature, are all distinct from each other."

(via georgianaspencer)

sailorgil:

" Portsmouth Point "  …  Bluejackets Ashore at Portsmouth, Circa 1810 … Artist:  Thomas Rowlandson

sailorgil:

" Portsmouth Point "  …  Bluejackets Ashore at Portsmouth, Circa 1810 … Artist:  Thomas Rowlandson

(via hms-surprise)

transistoradio:

Samuel Hieronymus Grimm (1733-1794), Great Hall at Battle Abbey (1783), watercolour. Collection of British Library, London, UK. Via Wikimedia Commons.

transistoradio:

Samuel Hieronymus Grimm (1733-1794), Great Hall at Battle Abbey (1783), watercolour. Collection of British Library, London, UK. Via Wikimedia Commons.

(via 18thcenturylove)

british-history:

The Bank of England Act
27 July 1694
The Bank of England Act was passed by Parliament on this day in British history, 27 July 1694. It officially founded the Bank of England, at the time only the second central bank in the world. The bank was primarily created to help finance a rebuilding of England’s navy in the face of defeat to France at the Battle of Beachy Head (1690), France’s greatest naval victory during the Nine Years’ War.

british-history:

The Bank of England Act

27 July 1694

The Bank of England Act was passed by Parliament on this day in British history, 27 July 1694. It officially founded the Bank of England, at the time only the second central bank in the world. The bank was primarily created to help finance a rebuilding of England’s navy in the face of defeat to France at the Battle of Beachy Head (1690), France’s greatest naval victory during the Nine Years’ War.

flock-of-jaguars:

Buckingham Palace in stamps.

(Source: mirror.co.uk)