houghtonlib:

Our contribution for this week’s Miniature Mondays is an almanac for 1785 in a contemporary richly gilt red morocco binding with matching slipcase.

Goldsmith, John, active 1656. An almanack for the year of our Lord God, M.DCC.LXXXV.

mTyp 705.85.432

Houghton Library, Harvard University

(via 18thcenturylove)

The Thames from Somerset House Terrace towards the city (top), and towards Westminster (bottom), by Canaletto, c1750.

From a gallery of images accompanying the BBC’s 18th Century season.

british-history:

A running steam locomotive was used for the first time on this day in British history, 21 February 1804. The locomotive’s inventor was Richard Trevithick, a mining engineer from Cornwall. After seeing several of Trevithick’s early models, Trevithick’s boss was impressed and bet a rival that the locomotive could haul 10 tons of iron a distance of 10 miles. On 21 February 1804, successfully carried 10 tons of iron, 5 wagons and 70 men the full distance in 4 hours and 5 minutes, an average speed of approximately 2.4 mph (3.9 km/h). The color image above shows a full-scale working replica of the “Pen-y-Darren” locomotive at the Swansea Maritime Museum.

detailsofpaintings:

Arthur Devis, Portrait of a Lady in a Landscape
1750

detailsofpaintings:

Arthur Devis, Portrait of a Lady in a Landscape

1750

oakapples:

A conceit written by the great botanist Sir Joseph Banks, illustrated by Austrian artist Ferdinand Bauer, and sent to HRH The Princess Elizabeth in 1814. I saw this on display at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge this afternoon as part of an exhibition of botanical illustrations. Note the Banksia flowers, named, of course, after Banks himself, and the Strelitzia, which is named for the duchy of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, birthplace of Charlotte, Queen of the United Kingdom and mother of Elizabeth.

oakapples:

A conceit written by the great botanist Sir Joseph Banks, illustrated by Austrian artist Ferdinand Bauer, and sent to HRH The Princess Elizabeth in 1814. I saw this on display at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge this afternoon as part of an exhibition of botanical illustrations. Note the Banksia flowers, named, of course, after Banks himself, and the Strelitzia, which is named for the duchy of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, birthplace of Charlotte, Queen of the United Kingdom and mother of Elizabeth.

(via ladycashasatiger)

Fire breaks out at National Archives in Kew, London
A fire broke out at the National Archives in Kew, home to some of the UK’s most important historical documents.
The National Archives is the official UK government archive and publisher. Held there are 11 million historical documents of national importance, some dating back more than 1,000 years. Among its collection are the Domesday Book, parchment, electronic records, photographs, posters, maps and paintings. A spokeswoman from the National Archives said everyone was evacuated from the building safely and no documents were damaged.
BBC
Fire breaks out at National Archives in Kew, London

A fire broke out at the National Archives in Kew, home to some of the UK’s most important historical documents.

The National Archives is the official UK government archive and publisher. Held there are 11 million historical documents of national importance, some dating back more than 1,000 years. Among its collection are the Domesday Book, parchment, electronic records, photographs, posters, maps and paintings. A spokeswoman from the National Archives said everyone was evacuated from the building safely and no documents were damaged.

BBC

creepingbite:

The Compleat Figure of the Minuet from An Easy Introduction to Dancing by George Bickham, c.1755.

creepingbite:

The Compleat Figure of the Minuet from An Easy Introduction to Dancing by George Bickham, c.1755.

(Source: prints.bl.uk)

inebriatedpony:

artschoolglasses:

Thomas Rowlandson - A Young Woman in a Blue Striped Dress

Rowlandson’s non-political, non-pornographic and non-satirical drawings are quite lovely.

inebriatedpony:

artschoolglasses:

Thomas Rowlandson - A Young Woman in a Blue Striped Dress

Rowlandson’s non-political, non-pornographic and non-satirical drawings are quite lovely.

(via ladycashasatiger)

Cold-Bath Fields Prison
This print represents an interior view of the prison, with two of the culprits at hard labour, in which they are employed for an hour at a time. The view is taken from the Water-Engine Court, where they are at work; through the opening of the arch appears part of the chapel. The instant exhibits the turn-key bringing two fresh men to relieve those who have completed their task: the alacrity in the looks of the men who are working, at the appearance of the other delinquents, is aptly contrasted with the surly brutality of the one, and almost stupid insensibility of the other; they neither of them appear to be thoroughly broke in to the discipline of the house. There is something magisterially characteristic in the tout-ensemble of the gaoler. The general effect is broad and interesting, and the perspective unexceptionable.
From Ackermann’s Microcosm of London, 1808 (1904 edition).

Cold-Bath Fields Prison

This print represents an interior view of the prison, with two of the culprits at hard labour, in which they are employed for an hour at a time. The view is taken from the Water-Engine Court, where they are at work; through the opening of the arch appears part of the chapel. The instant exhibits the turn-key bringing two fresh men to relieve those who have completed their task: the alacrity in the looks of the men who are working, at the appearance of the other delinquents, is aptly contrasted with the surly brutality of the one, and almost stupid insensibility of the other; they neither of them appear to be thoroughly broke in to the discipline of the house. There is something magisterially characteristic in the tout-ensemble of the gaoler. The general effect is broad and interesting, and the perspective unexceptionable.

From Ackermann’s Microcosm of London, 1808 (1904 edition).

(Source: creepingbite)